Trillium Announces the 2016 Construction Safety Branch of the Year!

Trillium Construction Services considers safety a #1 priority on and off the jobsite. With that said, Trillium instituted a challenge to the entire Construction Division this past year. The main goal? Reduce jobsite injuries! With that said, Trillium is proud to announce that the Jacksonville, FL Branch has been awarded the 2016 Construction Safety Branch of the Year Award. The Jacksonville office went through 2016 with zero injuries!

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Common FMLA Violations

While most FMLA processes are handled by a trained member of the HR department, have you thought about the impact that supervisors may have on your FMLA qualifying employees? Some of the most common FMLA violations could occur without HR ever being a part of the decision or process. Take a quick look at the some of the most common cited FMLA violations:

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Construction and the Fatal Four

As reported by OSHA and the U.S. Department of Labor, the construction industry saw the highest number of workplace deaths in 2013 with a total of 796 deaths reported. A drastic 57% of those deaths were attributed to what is referred to as the “Fatal Four” which includes falls, being caught between objects, electrocutions, and being struck by objects.

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OSHA's Revised HCS In Effect!

With the first compliance date effective December 1, 2013; the revised HCS is now in enforcement. What does this mean for employers? Employers are required to have their employees trained on the new label elements and the SDS format. This deadline is the first phase in the new compliance set forth when OSHA revised its Hazard Communication Standard to align with the United Nations’ Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labeling of Chemicals or GHS.

This revision includes two major changes; being the required use of new labeling elements and a standardized format for Safety Data Sheets replacing Material Safety Data Sheets. These changes were set forth to improve worker understanding of the hazards associated with the chemicals present in their workplace. OSHA has phased the new requirements in from December 2013 through June 2016.

The minimum required training topics to be completed by December 1, 2013 according to OSHA’s website include:

Training on label elements including information on:

  • Type of information the employee would expect to see on the new labels, including the
  1. Product identifier: how the hazardous chemical is identified. This can be (but is not limited to) the chemical name, code number or batch number. The manufacturer, importer or distributor can decide the appropriate product identifier. The same product identifier must be both on the label and in Section 1 of the SDS (Identification).
  2. Signal word: used to indicate the relative level of severity of hazard and alert the
    reader to a potential hazard on the label. There are only two signal words, “Danger” and “Warning.” Within a specific hazard class, “Danger” is used for the more severe
    hazards and “Warning” is used for the less severe hazards. There will only be one
    signal word on the label no matter how many hazards a chemical may have. If one
    of the hazards warrants a “Danger” signal word and another warrants the signal word
    “Warning,” then only “Danger” should appear on the label.
  3. Pictogram: OSHA’s required pictograms must be in the shape of a square set at a
    point and include a black hazard symbol on a white background with a red frame
    sufficiently wide enough to be clearly visible. A square red frame set at a point
    without a hazard symbol is not a pictogram and is not permitted on the label. OSHA
    has designated eight pictograms under this standard for application to a hazard
    category.  OSHA3491QuickCardPictogram
  4. Hazard statement(s): describe the nature of the hazard(s) of a chemical, including,
    where appropriate, the degree of hazard. For example: “Causes damage to kidneys
    through prolonged or repeated exposure when absorbed through the skin.” All of the applicable hazard statements must appear on the label. Hazard statements may
    be combined where appropriate to reduce redundancies and improve readability. The
    hazard statements are specific to the hazard classification categories, and chemical users should always see the same statement for the same hazards, no matter what the chemical is or who produces it.
  5. Precautionary statement(s): means a phrase that describes recommended measures that should be taken to minimize or prevent adverse effects resulting from exposure to a hazardous chemical or improper storage or handling.
  6. Name, address and phone number of the chemical manufacturer, distributor, or importer.
  • How an employee might use the labels in the workplace. For example:
  1. Explain how information on the label can be used to ensure proper storage of hazardous chemicals.
  2. Explain how the information on the label might be used to quickly locate information
    on first aid when needed by employees or emergency personnel.
  • General understanding of how the elements work together on a label. For example:
  1. Explain that where a chemical has multiple hazards, different pictograms are used to
    identify the various hazards. The employee should expect to see the appropriate
    pictogram for the corresponding hazard class.
  2. Explain that when there are similar precautionary statements, the one providing
    the most protective information will be included on the label.

Training on the format of the SDS must include information on:

  •  Standardized 16-section format, including the type of information found in the various sections.
  1. For example, the employee should be instructed that with the new format, Section 8 (Exposure Controls/Personal Protection) will always contain information about
    exposure limits, engineering controls and ways to protect yourself, including personal protective equipment.
  • How the information on the label is related to the SDS.
  1. For example, explain that the precautionary statements would be the same on the label and on the SDS.

For more information on the revisions visit OSHA’s website here.

Want to learn more about how you can gain access to Trillium’s national network of top level talent? Contact us today!  If you are a stand out in your profession and seeking contingent or long term career opportunities, visit our job seekers section for more information!

Trillium, a national leader in staffing and recruitment is a valued staffing partner to over 5,000 companies nationwide. Trillium is privately owned by Oskar René Poch.

 

 

 

Are You Using Truck-Specific GPS?

The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration is continuing their efforts to help drivers reduce bridge strikes and other dangerous accidents by distributing cards to truck drivers warning of the dangers that can arise from using GPS units meant for non-commercial and smaller vehicles.

Truck

The FMCSA has posted warnings on their site and continues to bring awareness to the dangers that come from using improper equipment. A 2009 study found that about 80% of bridge strikes in New York were a result of large vehicles using the wrong navigation devices. With simple prevention, drivers can avoid these life threatening accidents that often result in serious injuries, heavy equipment damage, costly road repairs, and long delays for other motorists. Click here for a copy of the FMCSA’s GPS Selection Guide for CMV’s.

Are you a stand out professional, technical professional, driver, or skilled worker seeking contingent, temporary, or long term career opportunities?  Visit our job board  for more information!  Want to learn more about how you can gain access to Trillium’s national network of professionals and skilled workers? Contact us today!

Trillium, a national leader in staffing and recruitment is a valued staffing partner to over 5,000 companies nationwide. Trillium is privately owned by Oskar René Poch.

 

Distracted Driving Remains A Deadly Epidemic

Despite a 2011 Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration regulation prohibiting the use of handheld phones while driving for bus and truck drivers, distracted driving is still a deadly epidemic on our roadways. According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, as many as 660,000 automobile drivers are using a cell phone or manipulating an electronic device during daylight hours.

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What does this risk factor amount to? Here are a few statistics from the CDC:

  In 2011, more than 3,300 people were killed in distracted driving related crashes

  • In 2011, more than 387,000 people were injured in distracted driving related crashes
  • In 2010, nearly 1 in 5 crashes that resulted in injury involved distracted driving
  • With professional drivers facing fines of almost $3,000 per offense and even loss of their license for repeat offenses for the use of handheld phones while driving, the FMCSA is working hard to combat the deadly issue. Unfortunately these consequences are not significant enough for some drivers. Companies who employ drivers must take additional steps and efforts to help enforce the safety of their staff and others. So what can you do?

    • Create and enforce policies in your employee handbook to prohibit distracted driving
    • ·         Place phone numbers on your vehicles allowing other drivers to report distracted or poor driving behaviors

    • ·         Regularly communicate the dangers of distracted driving to your staff and provide safety tips to prevent it

    • Make safety a main priority for your organization
    • Recognize and reward drivers for safe behaviors and compliance with your safety rules, state, and federal regulations

    Want to learn more about how you can gain access to Trillium’s national network of professional drivers? Contact us today! Learn more about our Dedicated Driver Services here! Are you a safe and professional driver who is seeking a rewarding career? Visit us here to locate a driving career in your area!

    Trillium, a national leader in staffing and recruitment is a valued staffing partner to over 5,000 companies nationwide. Trillium is privately owned by Oskar René Poch.


     

    Job Demands Increase with ACA

    Have the changes coming forth with the Affordable Care Act impacted your career? If so, you are not alone. Here are a few careers in which job demands have and will continue to increase, as a result of the ACA.

    • Human Resources
    • Payroll
    • Legal Professionals
    • Nurses
    • Occupational Therapists
    • Personal Trainers
    • Customer Service Professionals
    • Insurance Consultants
    • Medical Billers
    • Medical Coders
    • Computer Programmers

    Are you a stand out professional, technical professional, driver, or skilled worker seeking contingent, temporary, or long term career opportunities?  Visit our job board  for more information!  Want to learn more about how you can gain access to Trillium’s national network of professionals and skilled workers? Contact us today!

    Trillium, a national leader in staffing and recruitment is a valued staffing partner to over 5,000 companies nationwide. Trillium is privately owned by Oskar René Poch.

    How To Hire A CDL Driver

    Does your company specialize in something other than drivers? If so, hiring a safe a qualified CDL driver can be a serious task. Due to the nature of their product line, many manufacturers, retail facilities, and warehouses employ their own driving staff. Unfortunately due to strict DOT regulations, insurance, and other factors these employers may be opening themselves up to costly and dangerous liabilities.

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    How To Be Successful In Marine Staffing

    Whether you are searching for Marine Electricians, Shipfitters, or Pipefitters, the search for qualified skilled trades people with marine industry experience can be difficult. In our niche market, marine staffing has it’s own set of diverse challenges that can be difficult for those inexperienced in the industry to overcome. Let’s face it marine contractors across the world are able to find talent and get in forward motion, so the questions remains how do they do it?

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    EEOC Reports on 2012 Charges

    Have you recently faced an EEOC charge? If so, you’re not alone. The EEOC recently announced statistics from fiscal year 2012 that reflect over 99k charges in the private employment sector. What does that amount to for employers?

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